Arab-Israeli Conflict Essay

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The Palestinian-Israeli conflict is one of the more pervasive and protracted of our times. It is hardly, however, one of irreconcilable differences since a critical review of the six-decade history of this conflict indicates that periods of calm and tolerant co-existence are not uncommon and that, indeed, more than once, peace transitioned from a distant dream to a semi-tangible reality…

Introduction


The origins of today's conflict between the Jewish and Palestinian people lie in the birth of political Zionism at the end of the 19th century and the development of Arab nationalism in response to colonization during the British and Ottoman empires in the 19th and 20th centuries.1 Violence between the two groups first erupted in the 1920s and has continued to plague their relationship ever since. After World War I, the British promised Palestine to the Palestinian Arabs for a homeland while simultaneously guaranteeing it to the Zionists as a Jewish homeland.
In 1947, a British royal commission recommended the partition of Palestine in order to create a Jewish state, which ceded 55 % of Palestine to the new state of Israel.2 This recommendation was approved by the United Nations (UN) but rejected by the Arabs. Therefore, in 1948, when the first Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion declared the independence of Israel without specifying the state borders, seven Arab states attacked Israel. ...
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