Sociology (Culture & Immigration)

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Immigration is a way that local communities become globalized. It is a method of connecting communities externally and also transforms them from within as immigration draws on the global culture and integrates in into the local culture. Traditional consideration of immigration was that it was a process that needed to maintain local and national identities, by way of excluding or completely absorbing people from other states and cultures (Robinson, 2001).


Increasingly, the rights of groups such as immigrants (transnationals) came to the forefront of sociological discourse, and the "politics of identity" were at one time seen as constraining the solidarity of the welcoming states sense of citizenship and democracy. New ways of understanding the world were emerging (Mills & Wright, 1992; Robinson, 2001).
However, a contrasting viewpoint approached globalization as a positive change in the concept of democracy, and a positive end to the nation-state. At the same time multiculturalists advocated that minority rights were of importance and integrationists lobbied for solidarity of values and national aspirations, regardless of a citizen being an immigrant or a person born into the state. The argument focused on the concept of national identities being outdated. This approach stated that states will become less able to influence and regulate its immigrants, and in turn the groups will cease to consider themselves, and to be viewed as disadvantaged minority groups. ...
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