Memory, Thinking, and Intelligence

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Academic intelligence may be defined as the mental capacity for the assimilation and processing of abstract terms and concepts and, above all, the ability to easily grasp knowledge. Several behaviours are demonstrative of academic intelligence, some of which are listed below:


These are analytical, experiential and practical intelligence. The above listed behaviours for both academic and everyday intelligence fit into Sternberg's theory.
Academic intelligence corresponds with both experiential and componential intelligence, as defined by Sternberg. Experiential intelligence essentially refers to the capacity to comprehend tasks, even novel ones, and execute them efficiently. In relation to academic intelligence, it references the capacity to assimilate knowledge, comprehend abstract terms and apply that knowledge, including the translation of the abstract into the practical. As regards componential intelligence, it essentially refers to problem-solving which, in itself, is predicated on the intellectual analysis of the problem and the selection of the optimal solution. In others words, insofar as the behaviours listed for academic intelligence ultimately derive from the capacity to assimilate and apply new knowledge, they correspond to Sternberg's theory of intelligence.
As regards the behaviours listed for everyday intelligence, they correspond with Sternberg's experiential and practical intelligence. ...
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