The nature and paradox of Anglo-Saxon migrations of the fifth and sixth century

High school
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In the original sense of the word Anglo-Saxon denotes two of the three Germanic tribes, - Jutes, Angles and Saxons. These tribes in the middle of the fifth century AD left their homes on the shores of the North Sea and Baltic to conquer and colonize distant Britain.


(Stenton, 54)
But the central paradox of the Anglo- Saxon migration stays firm within the unavailability of substantial evidences. Till date there are considerable debates as to the extent of Anglo-Saxon migration from the fourth to the sixth centuries. This because we are unable to finds enough evidences regarding this migration and whatever is available proves to be unworthy as a sustainable source to prove within the academic consensus. As a result no single model of Anglo- Saxon migration can be taken into account academically.
The initial interpretation of the Anglo- Saxon migration during the fourth to the sixth centuries suggested that the Anglo-Saxon tribes arrived in Britain in large numbers and settled down instantly. This process was instigated by mass genocide and effective displacement of the local communities of the 'Britons' (as depicted in Latin Texts) from the eastern and southern parts of the island. It is also believed that a minority of the Romano-British fled to Brittany and Galicia in northern Spain.
Probably during the early sixth-century or late fifth century monk Gildas narrated the defeat of the British in the hand of the English and stated that ...
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