Film "Beethoven Lives Upstairs"

Movie Review
Pages 3 (753 words)
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The David Devine directed "Beethoven Lives Upstairs" presents itself as a multifaceted study of the life of musical genius Ludwig Van Beethoven. While primarily targeting children as its main audience, it also appeals to the more seasoned viewer with its meticulous attention to historical detail, as well as presenting a suitable and well crafted parallel of Beethoven's life.


It is not as simple as the introduction infers. In order for the musical score of a film to add a sense of immersion and dynamism to the viewer's experience, it has to merge flawlessly with other, crucial elements of cinematography. Unfortunately, for "Beethoven Lives Upstairs" the music of the master is sometimes used to mask other, less well constructed areas of filming. For example, the score often hides inconsistencies in the verbal story: in the introduction the Narrator tells the viewer that:
Presented without the distraction of the music which intersperses the scene with flawless elegance, the two statements regarding the weather seem ludicrous. Yet the "hook" of this particular scene is the powerful and evocative musical form, and for many viewers at least, they are too enthralled by the music to notice the inaccuracy.
That being said, it is all too easy to simply focus on the negative aspects of the film. Unsurprisingly, in a film about Beethoven one would expect the music to powerfully develop and contribute to the strength of the plot. By and large, it manages to achieve this. For example, the fictional Beethoven is sent out into the wet, stormy Vienna night, apparently just to make room for the storm passage from the Sixth Symphony. ...
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