Got a tricky question? Receive an answer from students like you! Try us!

American Indian Literature - Essay Example

Only on StudentShare
High school
Essay
Miscellaneous
Pages 2 (502 words)

Summary

The Native American culture has always taken pride in its warriors. This pride dates back hundreds of years, when warriors were one of the most revered people in each individual tribe. For male members of the tribe, hunting and fighting as a warrior were the two items of specific achievement…

Extract of sample
American Indian Literature

Thus, his ability to defend his people allows him to be seen as a hero by his tribesmen, and this also allows him to be revered and celebrated by his people.
Since warriors were so important to all Native American tribes, throughout their literature, we see the concept of the warrior as a hero, or as a powerful individual, bustling throughout this literature. Take, for example, the story of "Lucy, Oklahoma" in which "medicine men" become warriors, by way of witchcraft, on behalf of one of their abused kin. Medicine men are revered in Native American cultures, too, aren't they Of course they are-however, they are not usually seen as the heroes of battles-this is reserved for the warriors. If these medicine men are going to do their tribe justice and take revenge, they must fight. So, even though they are revered members of the tribe, we see that the status of the warrior in the tribe is even more revered-and thus, again, these men, in order to be heroes and to defend their tribe's ideals, must become warriors.
The status of the warrior in the Native American tribe is therefore revered and even holy. The ability of the warrior to defend his tribe and assure the tribe's survival, as well as the tribe's own respect and prestige (as is the case in "Lucy, Oklahoma") becomes very important to the tribe's own pride and honor. ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related Essays

West Indian literature.
Today, the West Indian literature is a universally acclaimed literary phenomenon, and the critics recognize without any scruples, the variegated richness and charm of the West Indian expression. In fact, the early voices in the West Indian literature furnish a relevant and valid insight into the evolution of West Indian life and in a way are a reliable compilation of the actual exchange of ideas taking place in the West Indian, social, cultural and literary life (Brathwaite 24). A majority of the early West Indian literature not only accommodates the social and political issues that commanded…
3 pages (753 words)
Indian Culture and American Culture
It is only when we understand the differences and similarities between the cultures of the two nations; we can better understand why people behave as they normally do. In the below paragraphs, the essay tries to examine the contrasts and similarities…
8 pages (2008 words)
Applying the Literary Analysis to Ernest Hemmingway's "Indian Camp"
Applying the Literary Analysis to Ernest Hemmingway's "Indian Camp" …
3 pages (753 words)
American Literature
Through violence she wants to evoke Christian mystery, though she doesn't exclude other approaches to her fiction: she states that she could not have written "A Good Man Is Hard to Find" in any other way but "there are perhaps other ways than my own in which this story could be read".…
4 pages (1004 words)