American Indian Literature

High school
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The Native American culture has always taken pride in its warriors. This pride dates back hundreds of years, when warriors were one of the most revered people in each individual tribe. For male members of the tribe, hunting and fighting as a warrior were the two items of specific achievement.


Thus, his ability to defend his people allows him to be seen as a hero by his tribesmen, and this also allows him to be revered and celebrated by his people.
Since warriors were so important to all Native American tribes, throughout their literature, we see the concept of the warrior as a hero, or as a powerful individual, bustling throughout this literature. Take, for example, the story of "Lucy, Oklahoma" in which "medicine men" become warriors, by way of witchcraft, on behalf of one of their abused kin. Medicine men are revered in Native American cultures, too, aren't they Of course they are-however, they are not usually seen as the heroes of battles-this is reserved for the warriors. If these medicine men are going to do their tribe justice and take revenge, they must fight. So, even though they are revered members of the tribe, we see that the status of the warrior in the tribe is even more revered-and thus, again, these men, in order to be heroes and to defend their tribe's ideals, must become warriors.
The status of the warrior in the Native American tribe is therefore revered and even holy. The ability of the warrior to defend his tribe and assure the tribe's survival, as well as the tribe's own respect and prestige (as is the case in "Lucy, Oklahoma") becomes very important to the tribe's own pride and honor. ...
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