Jonathan Kozol's Amazing Grace

Book Report/Review
Pages 3 (753 words)
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-1 In his novel Amazing Grace, Jonathan Kozol examines life in one of the nation's poorest locations, the South Bronx. Specifically, he examines the conditions in which the poorest children of the nation are attempting to live and grow. He also examines the cultural collective sin known as "the ghetto." It is, as Gregory Baum states, a situation that people in modern society perpetuate without even giving it much though.


Perhaps some imagine that they can remove the unsavory elements from bad neighborhoods, but with drug addiction, disease and unemployment ravaging the South Bronx, new people just rise up to fill the shoes of the criminals that go to jail.
Those just outside the ghetto deem it fit to pump their sewage and incinerate their medical waste in bad neighborhoods, but they rarely even think of what it would be like to live there when they vote for politicians that endorse tax cuts to the social programs people in the ghetto need for their very survival. Reverend Martha Overall states, "It hast to take extraordinary self-deceit for people who plant flowers on Park Avenue but pump their sewage into Harlemto imagine that they have the moral standing to be judges" (188). When he was mayor of New York City, Rudolph Giuliani cut taxes to keep the rich from fleeing the taxes of the city, resulting in "wide-sweeping cuts in a variety of services relied on by poor people" (100). When questioned by the media, a deputy mayor stated that "these reductions in municipal expenditures will be 'a victory for everybody' (100). ...
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