Got a tricky question? Receive an answer from students like you! Try us!

Literature. A Mexican American girl - Essay Example

Only on StudentShare
High school
Essay
Miscellaneous
Pages 2 (502 words)

Summary

She was the main protagonist, aged 12-13, a Mexican American girl whose dreams centered on living in a beautiful spacious white house with an open yard and trees. Her reality was a small crumbling red house with only two rooms, in a Chicago Latino district that she wants to escape from…

Extract of sample
Literature. A Mexican American girl


He was an example of an unreliable narrator, due to the many facets of his character. Montresor seemed to be lacking in friendships, sensitive, but devious and vindictive and most probably slightly paranoid. He perceived himself to be above or at any rate, alienated from the 'common herd', and believed he was a connoisseur of good wines. This last, he used as a trick to achieve vengeance on a supposed enemy. He appeared to be a complete loner through choice, and looked down on the rich who had not the old family heritage he possessed. He could be described equally as a sad, pitiful individual or a dangerous mad man.
Esperanza would put a Want Ad. in the paper for a used portable typewriter. She knew she had talent; her aunt Lupe told her to keep writing. She valued education, working to pay for it, and admired Alicia for studying. A typewriter would be a good start for her dreams to be made real.
He would put an obsequious obituary in the paper, as this would give him an opportunity to gloat over his success at achieving redress, while removing suspicion from himself. It would also allow him to appear to be mourning publicly and reinforce the faade of his and Fortunato's alleged friendship. He would use this as a way to state his superiority over others in his society.
Her tone and style would be serious ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related Essays

Mexican-American War
In addition, if one is to point the finger of blame at someone, at least a basic examination of who that person was, should be done first - as, even if the situation was that person's fault, an understanding of that person's motivation will surely give a greater understanding of the conflict itself. That is where this examination of the causes of the Mexican-American War will start - with a brief look at American's eleventh president himself. We will then deal with the westward expansion of the American population and the concept of Manifest Destiny. Only then will enough information be…
13 pages (3263 words)
Causes of the Mexican-American War
This idea also promoted the belief that the United States was ordained by God to govern the entire North America; and since it was so, it was only fitting that the destiny of the country be fulfilled.…
6 pages (1506 words)
American Literature
Through violence she wants to evoke Christian mystery, though she doesn't exclude other approaches to her fiction: she states that she could not have written "A Good Man Is Hard to Find" in any other way but "there are perhaps other ways than my own in which this story could be read".…
4 pages (1004 words)
Representatives of American Literature
The essay “Representatives of American Literature” outlines the major features of literature works in America and its representatives. There are several instances where literature written at a particular time was not accepted as part of American literature until years after it was published. In many cases rejection accompanied severe criticism and cruel treatment of the author. “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?” is a short story written by Joyce Carol Oates ventured into the issues of sex and violence. On the surface the narrative is fairly generic. “That Evening Sun” by…
6 pages (1506 words)
Mexican Immigration and American Identity
According to the author, even though other values and principles of non-Protestant immigrants have helped to shape and modified this concept, most Americans accept these basic elements of an Anglo-Protestant culture as the key defining elements of their national identity. Yet, the author states that in the last decades of the 20th century, this culture has been challenged by a context of globalization and ideas of multiculturalism and diversity. The rise of groups that focus on race, ethnicity, and gender over a more general national identity are regarded as a threat to 'the country's cultural…
4 pages (1004 words)