The Nature of Morality: Innate Code of Humanity or Perverted Dogma of Society

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The nature of morality is a list of rules. Granted, these rules or so-called principles are designed to encourage the good in humanity. Of course, the betterment of humanity through a moral code is a byproduct of society. No other species share such a code in order to survive in the wilderness.


Therefore, it is best to remain skeptical when discussing morality. It is a process that must remain harmless and respectful of individuals and their freedoms.
There are five basic principles that Thiroux and Krasemann have devised to act as a general blue print for morality in Ethics Theory and Practice. These principles were devised to counter Michael Scriven's "'Everyone has equal rights with you in moral matters until they prove otherwise.'" (Thiroux 163) Thiroux and Krasemann claim that such a statement is much too vague to act as an actual morality principle. I believe that the real case is how to interpret the statement. It allocates freedom between people until otherwise proven. The only logical reason someone should not have equal freedoms is when they violate other people's freedoms. When that occurs, people are going against the principle itself and are therefore void of its morality. Thus, the interpretation of Scriven's principle should be to the effect that people have equal freedoms until they violate the freedoms of other people through deliberate physical or economic harm.
This is not to say that Thiroux and Krasemann did not develop very beneficial principles. Their five principles honor the reverence of life, the encouragement of good deeds, justice, honesty, and individual freedom. ...
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