History of Communication

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Deaf history concentrates to a great extent, on a century old struggle over means to surmount a legacy of discrimination by people who are able to hear and also to provide enhanced scope for the deaf community. Language lies at the centre of this argument.


Following the emergence of the recent technological innovations such as the cochlear implants, issues of community, language, unification and identity keep on becoming rampant. (Deaf Culture: Introduction)
Following various efforts, the ultimate achievement was witnessed with the establishment of the Columbia Institute for the Deaf at Washington, DC in 1864. The later portion of the 19th century saw the growth of the oral theories of deaf education. Even though a lot of these theories persist, they have in common a stress on the value of acquiring oral skills, i.e. reading and speech in the educational training of the deaf children. It is very important to note that a major supporter of technique of oral methods was Alexander Graham Bell whose mother and wife had problems in hearing. The first important oral school in the U.S., Clarke School for the Deaf in Northampton, Massachusetts was opened in 1867. This variation in philosophy between the supporters of conventional sign language and those who are in favor of oral language formed a vital division across the second half of the 19th century as well as the 20th century. The differences were sometimes strong, resulting in intense divisions within the deaf education community. (History of Deaf Education in America)
The capability to educate in oral skills depends largely on the extent of hearing loss, the age in which the student lost his/her hearing ability particularly if it was prior to or followi ...
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