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Hegelian Idealism - Essay Example

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Miscellaneous
Pages 4 (1004 words)

Summary

Hegelian Idealism still attracts divergent criticism in varying degrees. Philosophy addresses complex issues and it is not a single, unified subject. The history of philosophy is an area relatively un-chartered by the established doctrine, and thus offers scope for exploring the tendency among scholars to escape from the present to the past…

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Hegelian Idealism


Hegel was refuted as part of the emergence of Anglo-American analytic philosophy in England, a century ago. Around the beginning of the last century three philosophical tendencies emerged with the influence of Hegel's Analytical approach: American pragmatism, Analytic philosophy, and Phenomenological movement. C S Peirce is considered as the founding father of American Pragmatism. J H Lambert and Immanuel Kant exhibited phenomenological tendencies whereas, Phenomenological movement and debate was set in motion by Edmund Husserl. Thus, it is difficult to understand Hegel's contribution to the problem of knowledge and contemporary debate on knowledge.
The romantic period flourished with Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Immanuel Kant who emphasized the self, creativity, imagination, and values of art in their works: Kant's idea, that human beings do not see the world directly but through a number of categories, resulted in looking at the world in a subjective perspective. Rousseau, in Social Contract, attempted to describe a society in which natural nobility and liberty of the spirit could flourish. Philosophers and writers like Goethe, Schelling, and Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel nurtured romanticism in Germany, while their contemporaries Coleridge and Wordsworth propagated it in Britain during eighteenth century. ...
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