on African Music - Essay Example

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on African Music

Keita even at the small age of 14 was selected to be a part of one of the five percussionists selected for the National ballet. He was a part of the National ballet until 1986, during which he won numerous gold medals and many other national and international accolades. He wanted to try out his own luck after leaving the National Ballet and moved to Ivory Coast. There he joined a music group Koteba and performed alongside the renowned African stars of that time. These included Kunda of Senegal, and Mory Kante of Guinea. He quickly progressed and became a lead drummer of Ballet Djoliba when he was just 15.. He was named as the Artistic Director in the year 1979, the first drummer ever to be given a position of artistic director. Mamady’s name soon began to be heard outside West Africa and he was persuaded by a group of percussionists form Belgium to teach and perform in Europe. In 1991, he opened his own institution of percussions in Belgium with the name of Tam Tam Mandingue. He also formed his own performance ensemble titled Sewa Ken which meant ‘“Without music there is no joy, without joy there is no music.” The school got worldwide fame and very soon its branches were opened in many famous cities around the world. Mamady decided to take his native culture and music to more borders and in 2003 he shifted his focus from Europe to the United States. ...
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[Name of the Author] [Name of the Instructor] [Course name] [Date] African Music Mamady Keita: Mamady Keita was born in August, 1950 in Balandugu, a small village in Guinea. Just before his birth, a soothsayer had prophesized to his mother that her child was destined for fame…
Author : kdurgan

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