MAKING THE RIGHT CHOICES: AT THE END OF LIFE

MAKING THE RIGHT CHOICES: AT THE END OF LIFE Research Paper example
High school
Research Paper
Nursing
Pages 7 (1757 words)
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MAKING THE RIGHT CHOICES: AT THE END OF LIFE Name Professor University Date Abstract Life is full of openings and every individual has the option of making a choice. Every choice has its consequences good or bad. We all live due to the decisions we make each and every day…

Introduction

Diseases which could not be treated in the past can now be curable or controlled. The use of palliative care is one method of ensuring that a person receives better healthcare during his last days of life. Individuals have options of using advance care planning or life sustaining treatments when making decisions regarding the kind of care they need at the end of life. Outline Thesis statement: It is a fact that all of us face an imminent death at any time. While still healthy it is thus essential for us to strategize on matters concerning health care. In light of these facts the thesis is based on the need to make the right decisions concerning end of life care. Introduction. What does end of life care entail The essence of end of life decisions The involvement of physicians and medical practitioners in the decision making regarding end of life care. Use of advance care planning method to ensure that right decisions are made according to an individual’s preferences. The process of shared decision making and its benefits Life support mechanisms Cultural influences on an individual’s decision making process. The withholding or withdrawing of certain medical treatments. Conclusion. Making right decisions All of us someday will end up dead. ...
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