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Gps systems in todays society - Research Paper Example

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Author : bernhardmaude
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Pages 3 (753 words)
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Date GPS Systems in Today’s Society The Global Positioning System (GPS) or formally known as Navigation Satellite Timing and Ranging (NAVSTAR) is a satellite-based navigation system made up of a network of 24 satellites placed into orbit by the U.S…

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Gps systems in todays society

One does not have to pay to use or subscribe to GPS. The GPS technology requires three segments, namely: the space segment, control segment and the user segment2 (Garmin Ltd. 4). The space segment is made up of at least 24 GPS satellites that orbit the earth twice a day in a specific pattern. The control segment is the segment responsible for constantly monitoring from the ground, the satellite’s movements, signals and orbital configuration. The user segment consists of the GPS receiver which collects and processes signals from the GPS satellites which then determines and computes location, velocity and time. Three aspects were emphasized during the development of the GPS3 (Zogg 9). First, it must assist its users in determining position, speed, and time, whether an object is in motion or at rest. Second, irrespective of the weather, it must have a continuous global, 3-dimensional positioning capability with a high degree of accuracy. And lastly, even ordinary people must be able to use it. This last aspect is the reason why GPS is now widely used not only in military operations but also in our everyday lives. GPS has a plethora of uses in our society today. Its applications can be found in various industries. Foremost among its uses is the tracking of people, commodities and the different modes of transportation. GPS receivers are used for determining position, speed and time. ...
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