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Economic of immigration - Research Paper Example

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Undergraduate
Research Paper
Nursing
Pages 5 (1255 words)

Summary

Name Tutor Course Date Gordon (2005) examined the economic aspects of welfare benefits associated with legal immigration that enable us to know the parties who gain or lose. Due to the adverse effects of immigration like depression of wages for low skilled workers and imposition of strains on economies there have been limitations to the number of immigrants allowed to cross boarders…

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Economic of immigration

Education levels among the citizens in the two neighboring countries are quite distinct in that the US government appreciates the value of technical training and therefore puts a great deal more emphasis on educating its citizens. Acquisition of technical knowledge imparts the adequate skills to the masses in the USA while low level of education and hence lack of high-end skills for immigrants from Mexico enables Americans to keep top level jobs. Implementation of different trade policies and immigration programs between the US and the Mexican government led to greater influx of immigrants into the USA. This was due to availability of low income opportunities in the USA that the lowly skilled immigrants from Mexico took up in order to sustain themselves. Therefore, the failures of such programs for example Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) should be heeded in conniving proper frameworks that allow for the dynamic participation of legal immigrant workers in the US economy failure to which there would be a larger population of illegitimate immigration with adverse effects to the economy. The economics of immigration in Mexico is of interest because Mexico borders an economic superpower-USA. This it means that immigrants from Mexico affect many different sectors of a world class economy. ...
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