Ethical and Legal implications of lack of access to healthcare

Ethical and Legal implications of lack of access to healthcare Case Study example
Undergraduate
Case Study
Nursing
Pages 3 (753 words)
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Ethical and legal implications of lack of access to healthcare Ethical Implications of lack of access to health care: The American Medical Association provides for and supports the society's obligation to offer adequate, effective and timely health care services to the patients in order to ensure that no single patient is left unattended due to lack of ability of their part to pay for the services received (Beauchamp, Childress, 1989)…

Introduction

The high expectations of ensuring effective care to those suffering from acute illnesses have taken a toll on the health care system in the country due to shortage of available resources against the number of people in need of care. Allocation of scarce resources in the midst of increasing costs and unemployment has led to a series of debates among scholars regarding the role and impact of ethics in provision of health care services. Although various health care reforms have been initiated over the years, to ensure better care for the citizens, the nurses and other care givers are entrusted with an ethical responsibility to provide equitable and fair distribution of resources (White, Duncan, 2002). The ethical obligation to offer adequate and timely health care services across all classes of the society entails two key principles of health care which includes - the provision of fair and equal opportunities to all members of the society and to protect and safeguard the interests of the vulnerable populations by providing them proper health care benefits. ...
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