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Analysis of a Disability Deafness - Essay Example

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Undergraduate
Author : vtillman
Essay
Nursing
Pages 3 (753 words)

Summary

Deafness Chapter 14 of the New Jersey administrative code focuses on the special education for the persons with disability who live in the state of New Jersey. The chapter, as provided by the constitution of New Jersey, recommends that all students with disability have access to free public education that is taught to every eligible student…

Extract of sample
Analysis of a Disability Deafness

Deaf people normally have a complete to partial hearing loss. They intentionally watch the lips of the person talking to them and intentionally move theirs, and have a tendency to ask people to repeat what they had said. In young children, the signs of deafness or the complete inability to hear may be characterized by lack of attention, lack of vocal communication, or reduced educational language development. Deaf person’s educational achievement is hindered by inability to hear, which affect their average class performance due to decreased levels of concentration in class. Deaf person’s social life in classrooms is also affected as most of them experience various levels of discrimination. Persons with disability also face difficulties in their education since they regularly change their career interests. This is caused by their inability to decide on the major fields of study that they are interested in to broaden their education. This affects their education in secondary or post-secondary education. Behaviors common with the deaf children includes the inability of students to concentrate in class. Students also have a low level of preparation in the classroom for the academic programs. When completely dissatisfied, they tend to cause disruptions in class. This can be by making too much noise, or even sleeping during class period. ...
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