Caring for Mentally Disordered Offenders

Caring for Mentally Disordered Offenders Essay example
Masters
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Nursing
Pages 8 (2008 words)
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CARING FOR MENTALLY DISORDERED OFFENDERS Name Professor Institution Course Date Caring for Mentally disordered offenders Introduction Mental disorder also referred to as mental illness refers to a state in which the mind of human beings fails to function as required (Lindstedt et al (2006)…

Introduction

The abnormality in the brain functioning is evident in many people. World Health Organization (WHO) statistics show 33% of people living in most countries has this problem (Lindstedt et al. 2006, p.334). Mental disability leads people to commit crimes without their knowledge. Causes The main causes of mental disorder are not clear. Theories trying to explain the causes exist but the truth is that there is no one known cause. The circumstances under which people suffer from mental disorder cut across biological factors such as inheritance, psychological factors, for example, depression and the environment in which people live (Rodriguez et al., 2006). In order to control or effectively care for affected people in the society, it is essential to know the cause of the illness to the person. Understanding ones, psychology will ease the way one relates with the affected people. Therefore, it is essential to elaborate on the causes of mental illness. Biological factors Studies show that abnormal balance of some chemicals found in the brain known as neurotransmitters causes the illness (Rodriguez et al. 2006, p.413). The chemicals enable communication in the brain. Any kinds of injury to these essential devices lead to mental problems. The spread of mental disorder can pass down family generations. ...
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