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Coronary Artery Disease - Research Paper Example

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Undergraduate
Research Paper
Nursing
Pages 5 (1255 words)

Summary

Coronary Artery Disease [Author’s Name] [Institution] This paper focuses on the problem of the nursing role in the coronary artery disease treatment, mainly in the coronary artery bypass surgery. Firstly, it discusses the general background of the problem: coronary art disease and how it is treated…

Extract of sample
Coronary Artery Disease

Finally, it concludes with the summary of what has been provided in the paper. Identification of the Concept: Coronary Art Disease Coronary art disease (abbreviated as CAD) may be defined as the end result of the specific process which sees accumulation, within the walls of those arteries that supply the myocardium, of atheromatous plaques (Kasliwal, 2009). The chronic systemic process of this disease is atherosclerosis. Normally, arteries’ inside walls are rather smooth and flexible, which allows easy blood flow. Plaques, which are fatty deposits, can build up in the wall of artery. This plaque will then narrow the artery and consequently stop or just reduce the blood flow. Atherosclerosis affects all body vascular beds and evolves due to a range of factors (Kasliwal, 2009). Manifested in various representations and involving numerous blood vessels in a body, when atherosclerosis reaches coronary arteries, it leads to coronary art disease; it also causes cerebrovascular disease (this is linked to the transient ischemic attack and stroke); aortic aneurysms; intestinal ischemia; and peripheral vascular disease (Homoud, 2008). Simply put, coronary art disease (CAD) results from the hardening of coronary arteries that are found on the heart surface. ...
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