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Nursing and Ethical Issues Final Case Study - Research Paper Example

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Undergraduate
Research Paper
Nursing
Pages 7 (1757 words)

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Running Head: Ethical Issues in Nursing Ethical Issues in Nursing Ethical Issues in Nursing “Death is a certainty for everyone and making the end of someone’s life a dignified end is the nurse’s responsibility and their ethical and moral obligation” - AP Clark, 2010…

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Nursing and Ethical Issues Final Case Study

Nurses have to deal with many Issues daily, ranging from inadequate healthcare, inefficient administration, distressed families, and uncooperative patients. Several ethical Issues arise in this profession because it deals with matters of life and death such as “the treatment of dying patients, dealing with Issues of abortion, euthanasia, and physical or chemical restraints” (Moyer, 2011). Nurses must deal with these problems keeping in mind the legal and professional implications of making any decision. A nurse must constantly combine “ethical reasoning and clinical judgment” (Nelson. 2006). Medicine and advances in science and technology have led to an improvement in the quality of life and have resulted in the prolongation of the lifespan of an average person. This is turn leads us to one of the biggest ethical debates that nurses face and that is in respect to withdrawal of care leading to a patient’s death or euthanasia. In Belgium and the Netherlands, laws declare that euthanasia is legal “under carefully delineated circumstances” and the Belgian euthanasia act defines it as the “administration of lethal drugs at the explicit request of the patient with the explicit intention of shortening the patient’s life” (Berghes, Casterle, & Gastmans, 2005). ...
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