Larval therapy for venous leg ulcers.

Larval therapy for venous leg ulcers. Literature review example
Masters
Literature review
Nursing
Pages 15 (3765 words)
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There are various nursing management techniques for venous leg ulcers, and these interventions range from medical, surgical, to alternative therapies. One of these alternative therapies is the larval therapy, where maggots are placed on the wound. …

Introduction

The maggots then proceed to consume the infections present in the wound and eventually ‘clean’ up the ulceration. This study shall provide a critical appraisal of larval therapy for venous leg ulcers. Initially, the background and aetiology of the disease shall be provided, followed by a critical appraisal of eight studies pertinent to this topic. This study is being carried out in order to establish a scholarly and comprehensive assessment of available literature on larval therapy on venous leg ulcers; it also seeks to assess the future general applicability of this therapy in the clinical practice. Venous leg ulcers are chronic and non-healing wounds or ulcerations on the leg or foot (NHS Choices, 2010). It is usually accompanied with symptoms of pain, itching, and inflammation in the affected area. Venous leg ulcers are seen when there is a persistent high pressure of blood in the veins of the legs which can later cause damage to the skin. Venous leg ulcers affect 1 in 500 individuals in the UK with rates increasing sharply with age (NHS Choices, 2010). About one person in every 50 over the age of 80 has a high risk for venous leg ulcers. Risk factors for this disease include immobility, obesity, advancing age, and varicosities (NHS Choices, 2010). The prognosis for venous leg ulcers is more or less good, however, with diabetic and elderly patients, the management may take longer. Nevertheless, with appropriate treatment, the healing can be ensured. ...
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