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Summary of the , “The Integrity Factor” by Kevin Mannoia (1996) - Book Report/Review Example

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Masters
Author : schroederhilma
Book Report/Review
Nursing
Pages 6 (1506 words)

Summary

“The Integrity Factor” provides valuable insights on leadership formation as it chronicles the various paths a Christian leader must go through to be successful as a servant of God. It describes five paths, envisioning a U-shaped journey towards leadership…

Extract of sample
Summary of the , “The Integrity Factor” by Kevin Mannoia (1996)

It describes five paths, envisioning a U-shaped journey towards successful leadership. The first path is the Downward Path, which involves the formation of a deeper character that is patterned after Jesus. This path may be unattractive and unpalatable to most people because it denies the individual of the use of his own will and instead, release it to God’s will. Most of the time people rationalize that what they do is in accordance to the will of God, however, they insert their own will and justify parts of it as what God wants from them and that they are doing the right thing. However, the downward path asks the leader to commit himself to the formation by completely releasing his own control of his will to God. This involves the release of his own personal possessions, glory and most importantly, identity. Now, someone else’s goals becomes more important than his own and he is totally emptied, becoming devoid of any ambition for himself that conflicts with what God wants. This path can be very painful as it is difficult to let go of one’s identity since it has always been emphasized as the center of one’s existence and now it needs to be let go. The downward path means emptying of our identity and becoming humble enough to surrender our will to God’s own. The Rugged Path continues on with the painful formation of a Christian leader. ...
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