Family Relationships in Ovid and Kafka

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There may be no more complicated relationships than the ones we have with our biological relatives, particularly our immediate family. We spend our first two decades developing from complete dependency to autonomy alongside and in front of one another, and it is in the ways that we either form or fail to form harmonious autonomy in these relationships that we determine, in large part, how adulthood will either be a time of success, or a time of struggle.


Hebrew law contains very specific provisions prohibiting sexual relations between just about any possible permutation of blood relatives, and one possible explanation for the detail of these regulations could be the frequent occurrence of incestuous sex.
The ancient Greek culture was also known for complex relationships among family members. The Oedipus complex, made so famous by the work of Freud, originated in the story of an infant prince sent far away from his home, because it was prophesied that he would grow up to kill his father and marry his mother. Despite the attempt to move the child, he did, through pure accident, fulfill the prophecy. Freud took Oedipus' name and used it to describe a latent desire in each son to take his father's place. While this is the most well-known example of dysfunctional relationships in a family along sexual lines in Greek lore, it is certainly not the only one. Ovid's Metamorphoses is one of the earliest sources of the myth of Myrrha. According to the story, Myrrha was the daughter of Cinyras, king of Cyprus. ...
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