Poems of Friendship by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Book Report/Review
Pages 6 (1506 words)
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This poem, written just before his marriage, and following closely after the composition of 'The Eolian Harp', has been termed, along with several other pieces, a 'conversation poem' or, as George McLean Harper (1960) describes them, 'Poems of Friendship.' Whichever label is applied, there is no doubt that this piece exemplifies the 'special' quality of Coleridge as a master of the genre.


The 'voice' is his own, he speaks aloud the thoughts and feelings that are important to him, as though to a friend or loved one. Such is the power of the poem, and quality of the writing, that the reader easily becomes that 'friend'.
Using blank verse, which is said to adhere closely to the naturally occurring rhythms of spoken English, the poet's own voice is easily heard. This flow and cadence is also more realistically maintained by the way in which divisions of ideas, themes or concepts are presented; not divided into stanzas, but verse paragraphs. As with any good conversation, the language is designed to communicate clearly, naturally and with evident personal connection. Though essentially a monologue, the piece demonstrates the interaction between the inner mind of the poet, the audience and the natural world. Coleridge shows and shares himself, his thoughts, emotions and love of nature, expressing a unity of all these throughout.
"' the tripartite rondo structure', beginning with the introduction of a particular situation, going through a middle part of the speaker's meditation, and ending with a return to the original situation after t ...
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