Social Behaviour

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The behaviour of people in social groups differs for reasons almost as variable as the number of people in the group. There have, however, been some salient similarities found among groups and these have been reported by psychological researchers. Some, like Darley and Baston, have found that a person's likelihood of attracting the help of another in a situation depends on the amount of time available to the person from whom the help is sought, or in other words, how busy he or she might be (Wetering).


Another prosocial idea is that persons behave according to the theory of reciprocal altruism, in which persons help others in the expectation of receiving something in return. Persons might also help others when faced with guilt or the need to repay a good deed that was previously done to them. This is known as guilt or reparative altruism (Wetering).
On the other hand, situations exist in which persons might not be inclined to help. Situations of moralistic aggression may arise, in which people feel that others are taking advantage of their altruistic tendencies, and in such cases they might not be inclined to help. Such is often the case in larger cities where cheaters are apt to exist. Subtle cheating and mimicry abound, through which people might pretend to be in distress in order to elicit altruistic behaviour. Such situations are likely to cause moralistic aggression to arise in persons as a protective mechanism (Wetering).
The social setting also determines the type of behaviour one can expect from a person. ...
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