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to what extent are our sexualities fixed at birth? - Essay Example

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Masters
Author : martine22
Essay
People
Pages 7 (1757 words)

Summary

The question of gender has been one of the most relevant questions discussed in contemporary world and recognizing gender has a crucial role in the modern world. Gender difference and recognition is evident all though the lives of human beings and every aspect of social living is marked by the question of one's gender or sexuality…

Extract of sample
to what extent are our sexualities fixed at birth?

Significantly, scholars have debated on whether one's sexuality is fixed at birth or not, and one dominant argument is that being a man or a woman is not a fixed state, as it is a becoming or a condition actively under construction. According to major French feminists like Simone de Beauvoir, one is not born, but becomes, a woman. "So we cannot think of womanhood or manhood as fixed by nature. But neither should we think of them as simply imposed from outside, by social norms or pressure from authorities. People construct themselves as masculine or feminine. We claim a place in the gender order - or respond to the place we have been given - by the way we conduct ourselves in everyday life." (Connell, 4) Therefore, one's sexuality is not completely fixed either by birth or by upbringing, and it is fundamental to realize to what extent are our sexualities fixed at birth. This paper makes a reflective analysis of the question to what extent our sexualities are fixed at birth.
Gender is not fixed by nature alone, i.e. one does not completely assume one's manhood or womanhood by birth. ...
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