The Nature of Realism in the Film 'Psycho

Movie Review
Performing Arts
Pages 8 (2008 words)
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The film Psycho has been created with realism and the addition of only a psychological twist of a depraved man. Everything in the film is realistic and there is no reason for any other element of the supernatural to make the film appear extra-terrestrial.


Yet, there aren't any shots in the film that can be convincingly categorized as one of horror.
What is achieved ultimately is the unfolding of the emerging suspense through plots of actions pieced together in order to serve as background and also connect them to the central story. There is not even an iota of the ethereal to make the film look like it is made using standards other than what is common in daily life.
Undoubtedly, Hitchcock has successfully utilized the rules of dramatics to keep the audience on the edge with well crafted sequences, actions and dialogues, and has taken the trouble to keep the hearts beating fast to match the film with the title.
The film begins randomly with the scene of the city of Phoenix and settles down on a window with the Venetian blinds covering it. The scene within the window is that of Marion Crane and Sam Loomis engaged in love making. Marion goes on to hog the scene from then on for nearly half of the film's duration.
The film begins with her affair with Sam Loomis. From here we are taken to her office. At the office, she faces Tom Cassidy, played by Frank Albertson, and his lecherous behavior. She chooses to steal the money he gives her in cash to buy a home for "his little girl." This event is actually the precursor to the entire film. Had she not secretly decided to steal the money, she would not have had any reason to leave Phoenix, Arizona. ...
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