Technological Singularity - Essay Example

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Technological Singularity

Futuristic writings from the genre of science fiction actually paved the vista to comprehend the predicament the human race might need to face in the race of development and technological advancement. One such futuristic writer is Ray Kurzweil. Kurzweil wrote a book in 2005, entitled ‘The Singularity is Near’ where he recorded his thoughts regarding the pros and cons of the future technology. In 2009, the American filmmaker Barry Ptolemy made a documentary entitled Transcendent Man based on the thoughts and life of the futurist author Ray Kurzweil where the concept of technological singularity is made the loci. Moreover, the life and his vision are discussed at length, and Ray is followed by Ptolemy around the world. Thesis Statement This essay intends to discuss the concepts of technological singularity envisaged by the futurist writer Ray Kurzweil as portrayed by the documentary Transcendent Man along with a vivid discussion on the way the philosophy of the technological advancement and glitch is being portrayed in the film. ...
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Transcendent Man Introduction Human beings are blessed with the most developed brain amid all species. And, with the bliss of this facet, human beings have evolved out as the most advanced particle of the entire phenomena of evolution. Since the initiation of civilization to the modern technical glitch, human beings have only developed themselves…
Author : eleanore44

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