Explicate Descartes dream argument, taking care to lay out what it calls into doubt and the reason it does. How might you respon

Explicate Descartes dream argument, taking care to lay out what it calls into doubt and the reason it does. How might you respon Essay example
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Name Instructor Course Date Explicate Descartes’ Dream Argument Introduction Rene Descartes (1596-1650) was a creative mathematician as well as a scientific thinker. He has some specific achievement in natural philosophy. He offered a new vision on the natural world that continues to shape the thought of humankind today…

Introduction

In Descartes’ dream argument, he casts several doubts about the things he knew. First, he does not believe that all the information received by our senses is accurate. After his revelation, he undertook an intellectual rebirth. His first prompt was to throw away everything he knew and believed in before proving himself that they were satisfactory. He concluded that it would be difficult to analyze each idea individually, instead, he attacked the foundation. In his argument, he states that he often dreams of things that seem real in his sleep. In one dream where he sits by a fire, he can feel the warmth of the fire just like when he is awake. He concludes that if his senses can convey warmth while he is dreaming, then he cannot trust the fire exists when he feels it in his waking life. He goes ahead to argue that if we dream that our hands and bodies exist then they actually do. Even if certain objects do not exist, the basic colors that compose them exist. He trusts his perceptions of the existence of self-evident truths such as shapes and numbers because he believes in an omnipotent God who created these things. It can be argued that when we are asleep we could feel things similar to when we are awake because we cannot tell whether we a dreaming or not. ...
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