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Assessing Traditional Arguments about God's Existence - Essay Example

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Undergraduate
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 3 (753 words)

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Name: Tutor: Course: Date: Assessing the Ontological theory of God’s existence The ontological arguments, which lead to the general conclusion that a super powerful God exists is derived from the premises grounded on pure reason, rather than from the observation of the physical world…

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Assessing Traditional Arguments about God's Existence

Anselm during the 11th century CE. According to him, the existence of God can be derived from the belief that a being, which is more powerful than any other can be, conceived (Pojman 54). The argument goes ahead to hold that, considering that a more powerful being cannot be conceived is evidence to show that the only conceivable being that can be conceived remains the greatest. Therefore, the conception of an all-powerful God that surpasses all other beings shows that God exists. I believe that the ontological theory is not successful, mainly because it is one grounded upon reason, and it is obvious that the reasoning of a man is guided and based upon his past experience and the knowledge held. In supporting the argument, the proponents argue that disputing the existence of God is awkward, like the act of imagining that a four-sided triangle, which cannot be drawn (Malcolm 41-50). The proponents continue to argue that humans can tell that claims disputing God’s existence can be rejected without referring to any evidence or tolerating any arguments in support of the viewpoint. The unsuccessfulness of the argument can be verified from the very premises it is built upon, including that it relies upon the experience and the knowledge of man to impose the viewpoint that God exists, without exploring anything beyond the reasoning of man (Pojman 54). ...
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