Got a tricky question? Receive an answer from students like you! Try us!

A utilitarian approach to poverty - Essay Example

Only on StudentShare
College
Author : kobejacobs
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 4 (1004 words)

Summary

Utilitarianism as a philosophy and point of view is focused upon achieving greatest good for the greatest number of people. It therefore sheds light on the moral issues and where to take moral actions regardless of the overall consequences of such actions on the individuals if that moral action actually results into the greater good for greater number of people…

Extract of sample
A utilitarian approach to poverty

Singer further argues that people in rich countries spend their income on things which are effectively useless for them. Singer therefore argues that if people can actually curtail their expenses on unnecessary things and donate them, they can actually contribute towards the improvement in the lives of many. Singer’s thesis is critically more important because it outlines the need to have a broader and compassionate view of the poor of the world and how their lives can be improved with just little bit of effort. Singer therefore suggests that rich should help poor because their help will actually result into greater good for the greatest number of people. He also provides the analogy of Bob Bugati and suggests how people from developed world actually ignore how a small time effort can save lives. Singer than suggests that there may be certain objections as to whether the funds donated or the help provided by the Westerners actually end up being utilized properly. There is a clear argument of whether the aid or the donations offered at the personal level can actually be utilized for the purpose for which they are given. ...
Download paper

Related Essays

Philosophy of the Mind/Theology
A thesis is not a topic or a question. It is a statement that is possibly controversial and requires some argument to establish. For instance, suppose you wanted to attack Socrates’ implied claim that what we take for reality is really just a shadow play compared to the truly real. In that case, your thesis could be: “Socrates’ view that we are constantly deceived about reality is false.” None of the following would be acceptable as theses: “Is Socrates’ skepticism about our knowledge of reality justified or not?” “This paper is about Socrates’ skepticism about our knowledge…
3 pages (753 words)
Gambling From a Utilitarian and Deontology Point of View.
This is not the case though with the utilitarian school of thought as it propagates that man takes action after considering what brings him the greatest pleasure. The Utilitarian system deems that gambling should not be banned as it gives happiness to those practicing it without necessarily bringing pain to anyone else (Collins 42). Deontology on the other hand leans towards the opinion that everyone has a moral duty and obligation depending on where they are placed towards others, and as they partake of any action, they should consider this moral duty (Sulkunen 158). This work attempts to go…
7 pages (1757 words)
Utilitarian versus Retributivist Views
The essence, focal points, main ideas and the merits of these two main theories are therefore to be discussed forthwith, in the ensuing discourse. Primarily, utilitarianism places focus on the consequences of the punishment, while retributivism is concerned with the retributive justice which is associated with the infliction of harm on the transgressor. Ideas Used In Utilitarian or Retributivist Theories Given that that utilitarianism is both a theory of punishment and ethics, it mainly takes on a consequentialist nature, because of its particular focus on the consequences of actions that have…
6 pages (1506 words)
Global Justice & Global Poverty
Some of the constutuents that measure living standards include the per capita, age of people and life expentancy among others. There is the fear of the gap widening more in the years to come if no action has taken place to curb this problem. Inequality is massive in the decision making of policies in the international political and in financial insititutions.John Rawl explains this in his theory on global liberties. They exist in form of both global economic and political basis. “There is uneven distribution of resources in the world” (Pogge, p34, par 3); hence, causing inequality in the…
6 pages (1506 words)
Utilitarian vs. Deontological Perspectives: Human Cloning
Yet, human beings have found that there may be potential benefits in creating human clones for a number of different reasons. The debate on this subject has been going on for decades and will likely continue to do so for some time. There are many different philosophical perspectives that one could apply to the issue of human cloning; it is the utilitarian and deontological perspective that offer two interesting comparative views. Human cloning has dominated science fiction for decades with scenarios revealing how the practice could go terribly wrong. Ethical debates have proposed many other…
3 pages (753 words)
Bentham’s utilitarian principle
Based on these theories, societies, along with its member, behaves according to what they thought is applicable and appropriate. Happiness and pleasure against sorrow and pain controls every individual, thus behave according to the amount these opposing nature with the risk of the consequences that their action entails. This utilitarianism principle is what is thought to have governed the world as proposed by Jeremy Bentham. At present, Bentham’s (1781) utilitarian principle is considered as the most appropriate and the most modern among other ethical principles in the society. He regards…
4 pages (1004 words)
Jeremy Bentham Concept of Utilitarianism
In order to understand Bentham's concept of right and wrong, a close examination of the context of which it was declared, should be put into consideration. It should be remembered that in Bentham's previous works, he had been critical of the concept and the proposed theories of natural rights which he dismissed as a 'rhetorical nonsense'1, mainly based on "imaginary laws.fancied and invented by poets and dealers of moral and intellectual poisons".2 For Bentham, these abstractions cannot replace specific legislations. Furthermore, he shows scepticism on the existence of universal absolutes -…
8 pages (2008 words)