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George Berkeley and his famous work A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge - Essay Example

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Author : ewill
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Philosophy
Pages 10 (2510 words)

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Name Philosophy 2 November 2013 George Berkeley and his Famous Work: A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge Introduction George Berkeley was born in 1685 in Ireland (Olscamp 1). His father was known as William Berkeley and “was related to Lord Berkeley of Stratton, who was the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland from 1670 to 1672” (Olscamp 1)…

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George Berkeley and his famous work A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge

Berkeley was a great a philosopher with many philosophical achievements under his theories of idealism and immaterialism. He is also best remembered for his early works on vision and metaphysics, the latter regarding the treatise concerning the principles of human knowledge (Olscamp1). His death occurred in 1753 and according to his will, his body was to be kept above the ground for some time before burial; this shows how great a philosopher he was. Being a philosopher, Berkeley took time to study wisdom and truth. It is normally assumed that those who take such direction in life have greater enjoyment of life and peace of mind with clear understanding of many things. Another assumption that exists is that these philosophers have fewer disturbances than any other man. The other group of people who are not philosophers often put blames on objects and facilities that are meant to help human beings, rather than taking the responsibility so that humans can change and live a better life. Berkeley urges us to have belief in God who has been generous to men giving them great desire to have knowledge (Berkeley, “A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge” 1). ...
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