Preview 8 Hayek, The Road to Serfdom - Essay Example

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Preview 8 Hayek, The Road to Serfdom

But unfortunately its meaning is highly ambiguous” (76). The book attempts to bring out what is good to humankind while at the same time addressing how best humankind can manage to embrace good for communal happiness. Following these, the book focuses on the need of freedom for all with more concentration on the minority and economic affairs. This is evident in where he states that “the will of a small minority be imposed upon the people” (107). This is in support of the minority so as to have them enjoy the share of freedom, property and money through centralized goals. THE NATURE OF HAPPINESS IS socially determined. The book addresses issues of social injustices which are in most cases detrimental to the minority. This is particularly with regards to property and freedom. He focuses on satisfaction for all so as to ensure there is freedom and social equity for all when he states that “the world needs that which is satisfactory” (98). It is through a satisfied world that the minority will also have a place and voice. He therefore calls for centralized planning as well as organization which will ensure that all the society is happily considered. ...
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Name: Instructor: Course: Date: Preview 8 Hayek, The Road to Serfdom THE NATURE OF MANKIND IS contemplative of what good the nature has to offer or present. This is mainly in focus to what humans have in possessions. There are cases and situations when the minority has been sidelined from getting full access to what is communally perceived as belonging to the society…
Author : estark

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