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Provide an argument for the claim that (some) mental states are not identical to any brain state. - Essay Example

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Undergraduate
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Philosophy
Pages 4 (1004 words)

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Argumentative Essay Introduction There have been different philosophical theories about brain state and mental state. Brain state refers to the physiological condition of the brain or the nervous system, while the mental state refers to the pains, desires, thoughts, and beliefs…

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Provide an argument for the claim that (some) mental states are not identical to any brain state.

Furthermore, it will discuss the relevant concepts in philosophy that will either affirm or negate these suppositions. In order to make this possible, the monist and dualist concepts are also discussed. Some mental states (beliefs) are not identical to any brain state The first argument being focused in this paper is the difference between mental and brain states. As mentioned earlier, these two are different concepts. Many people are confused and often use these two interchangeably. The mental state has a deeper context compared to that of the brain state. This is so because it refers to the state of a person’s thoughts regarding pain or happiness, what a person believes in, and also ideas and aspirations. On the other hand, the brain state refers to the literal condition of the nervous system like a brain activity. According to Adam Sennet (chap. 5), some mental states, like beliefs, are not identical or similar to any brain state. This is because beliefs are not part of any physiological activities of the body particularly inside the brain. the famous philosopher Descartes (qtd. in Carruthers 7) postulated that the mind is not spatial but has the ability to think, while the body is spatial but is unable to think; hence, the body is only capable of biological and physiological activities. ...
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