David Armstrong, 'Universals as Attributes' from Universals: An Opinionated Introduction

David Armstrong,
Undergraduate
Term Paper
Philosophy
Pages 8 (2008 words)
Download 0
Name of Student Name of Professor Course Date of Paper Argument against David Armstrong’s ‘Universals as Attributes’ from “Universals: An Opinionated Introduction” David Armstrong’s Universals as Attributes hold a proposition that the universe exists and that once this postulate is accepted the proposition that they may have varying attributes at certain degrees…

Introduction

As elements of particulars resemble closer with one another, identity becomes stronger; hence, two particulars become one and resemblance becomes an identity (109). In this paper, this argument is negated with the supposition that two different universes cannot be identical because they do not resemble completely as they have different elements. Armstrong’s Arguments Structural Universals Armstrong emphasizes in this idea that universals that resemble one another are complex universals and that they have common elements. These are also called structural universals. He further explains that they overlap due to common or identical parts. The more universals overlap, the more they resemble one another (120). Structural universals are considered to have parts according to Armstrong (122). These have non- metrological composition whereby it is possible that there are two can contain similar and simple elements. Hence, he redefines structural universals as having elements or constituents instead of parts. If this kind of universal has the appropriate parts, it they will overlap in a mereological manner. Chemical elements for instance overlap completely. Butane and isobutane can totally overlap because they have a similar element which is carbon (Pautz 110). ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?

Related papers

Rationalism (Rene Descartes) and Empiricism (David Hume).
For example, in philosophy, there are two contrastive schools of thought; while one gives premium to reason, the other gives premium to experience. The first school of thought that gives premium to reason is the rationalist school of thought. The second school of thought is the empiricist school. While the major proponent for rationalism is Rene Descartes, the major proponent of empiricism is…
Descartes and David
Researcher and philosopher would have to decide whether to go where with which type of inquiry method. Empirical method of inquiry to which Mr. David Hume belongs is basically the research which is based on the direct experiences and observations made. This method is adopted usually to test a hypothesis drawn for a research. Hypothesis is the assessment of association of variables and phenomenon…
The views of Plato with Aristotle on the nature of universals
He maintained that general ideas (universals) have a real existence, while the individual things that appeared to people really existing did not exist in fact. Ideas composed a special world, the reality of which was permanent and immobile. The ideas were the true cause of all things, their properties, relations, and, simultaneously, their goal. The general was dying in the individual specific…
Defense Paper: David Hume
Every person has his own perception of the world, thus, he/she may have his/her own experience. Hume states that we all have our own views and there are no two views which are actually the same. From here Hume derives his attitude towards scientific knowledge. His view of knowledge also raised indignation and misunderstanding among scholars as the philosopher stated that there is nothing certain…
David Hume
om senses, and also not from rational thought. Instead, according to Hume, the idea of self comes from imagination. In turn, imagination stems from causation and memory. To this effect, Hume is of the persuasion that the sole question concerning the creation of self identity is how the elements [contiguity and causation] combine so as to produce the uninterrupted idea of self. In regard to the…
compare David Hume's ideas
He argues that impressions emanate via human senses, feelings and reactions, and other mental features, they are the active perceptions we have because of hearing, seeing, feeling, loving, hating perceptions craving and ambitions. When we hear, see, feel love, hate, desire or will. Ideas refer to the less active perceptions and reactions we have at the thought and imagination of these sensations,…
Aristotelian Universals and Platonic Universals
Conflict of Universals: Conflict of universals or problem of universals is quite a long debated issue among the philosophers. The basic point of argument remains the same whether the universals exist or not. There has always been an attempt to ' "account for the phenomenon of similarity or attribute agreement among things." Whether a table made of rock or a stone both are similar or both have…