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compare David Hume's ideas - Essay Example

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Comparison David Hume and Descartes Ideas David Hume’s excerpt “Of the origin of our ideas” David Hume was a famous Scottish philosopher widely known for his philosophical experimentation and uncertainty…

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compare David Hume's ideas

He argues that impressions emanate via human senses, feelings and reactions, and other mental features, they are the active perceptions we have because of hearing, seeing, feeling, loving, hating perceptions craving and ambitions. When we hear, see, feel love, hate, desire or will. Ideas refer to the less active perceptions and reactions we have at the thought and imagination of these sensations, the faint pictures painted in our minds by these thoughts and reasoning. He also added that the difference between ideas and impressions is in the degree of force applied by each of them on the mind (Hume, 1). Construction of ideas occurs from the impressions that we have and in three distinct ways: ideas from simple impressions in three ways: the affinity, coherence, and connection. Hume goes ahead and categorizes human rationality as either facts or just simple ideas. In the first category, he analyses facts hatched from experience. Despite the fact that thoughts originating from association of ideas may be inexistent, their truth is rationally flawless. A good illustration is in the case of a square; it will always have four corners irrespective of whether it exists in reality or not. It is possible for us to imagine the unseen things e.g., a monster but all our self-created perceptions emanate from sense and experience. ...
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