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John Locke and property righs - Essay Example

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High school
Author : eschimmel
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 3 (753 words)

Summary

The Rawlsian Philosophy John Rawls’ theory of justice is one of the most interesting philosophies to have emerged in modern times. It was introduced in the 1970s when A Theory of Justice was published. It was revised several times, with the most recent done in the year 1999…

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John Locke and property righs

This position allowed Rawls to address two contemporary issues that are equally important but also tend oppose each other’s views: freedom and equality. The Rawlsian theory of justice is influenced by Hume’s philosophy with its critique of justice, that which prioritizes conventions and universal meaning (Forbes, 1985, 68). Hume talked about artificial justice and Rawls coined the so-called artificial device or the “original position”, which is used to determine justice. It also takes inspiration from Kantian principles, which emphasize moral nobility and the complexity and richness of human life and experience. The beauty of Rawls’ philosophy is its simplicity. The challenge of including the interests of the whole or the large number as well as those of the individual’s was addressed assuming a degree of ignorance in order to attain a desired fairness. It first rejects everything in order to get to the bottom of fairness, and justice is then determined. What this means is that similar crimes would have different resolutions because the conditions and parties in each crime are different. Also, there are crimes that in traditional justice could easily be punished because it fits a conventional mold. ...
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