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Thomas Kuhn`s Pradigm theory - Essay Example

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High school
Author : kathryne78
Essay
Philosophy
Pages 11 (2761 words)

Summary

This paper describes Thomas Kuhn’s Paradigm theory and the existence of paradigm shifts in scientific disciplines, resulting from technological and theoretical advancements. Thomas Kuhn introduced the concept of incommensurability and paradigm changes in the philosophy of science…

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Thomas Kuhn`s Pradigm theory

The failure of foundationalism was the development of Weltanschauung views of Thomas Kuhn and some philosophers. His book, The Structure of Scientific Revolution, published in 1962, is the most cited book in the twentieth century. Thomas Kuhn introduced incommensurability, normal science and paradigm changes to the philosophy of science in this book.
Incommensurability is used to describe conditions when one is not able to judge and compare the same standards, or have no common standard of measurement. This word originated in the 16th century, from the Latin word ‘incommensurabilis’, in a mathematical sense. According to Brown, both Thomas Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend, introduced incommensurability in the context of mathematics. For instance, in the Pythagoreans theory, the diagonal of a square with magnitude 1 is √2. However, this meaning of the irrational number cannot be expressed exactly, which holds true. Incommensurability, thus, describes the inability to compare unrelated concepts.
Paradigm is defined as a typical example, pattern, or model of something, which can also be expressed as a global view of a theory and methodology of a particular scientific topic. This phrase originated in the late 15th century via the Greek word ‘paradeigma’. Thomas Kuhn claimed that science undergoes a paradigm shift, which is discontinuous. ...
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