Political Philosophy by Rousseau - Essay Example

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Political Philosophy by Rousseau

He is free only if he can express his interest and individuality. He said, “Each man in giving himself to all, gives himself to nobody” (192). He was placing the individual in a responsible and responsive society that can create, run a government and participate in it. Collective decisions are the core of democracy, equality, liberty, fraternity. “As an ideal, the general will is, for Rousseau, a genuine universal….It is the unity through which the addictive collection of wills gets its meaning,” Dyke (1969, p.23). Rousseau argues in favour of general will at every step. “The general will is the will of all when we are not thinking about our own selfish interests but about the general interest” Roberts (1997). .


According to him if the laws of the land are good, it will reflect in the goodness of citizens and hence, the law is the root cause of good and bad both and so is highly significant. Especially the political, fundamental laws have to be wise and they connect the sovereign to people, one citizen to another, and connect the law to citizens. They also form the constitution of the state, which can wield power in every day life of the citizen. It is in the interest of all, it will affect all and rules all, and hence, participation of all is necessary.
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Summary

Law - An abstract expression of the general will that is universally applicable. Laws deal only with the people collectively, and cannot deal with any particulars. They are essentially a record of what the people collectively desire. …
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