Buddhist Philosophy

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Buddhist philosophy is a thought process that can be easily applicable in the die-hard competition of the Modern era. It can bring solace to the human mind once applied correctly. Buddhism has an often-overlapping quest for the ultimate end in life- Enlightenment.


This state of "the highest happiness" as defined by the Buddha in 'Dhammapada', is not a ephemeral, material happiness, but an enduring and transcendental one integral to the calmness attained through enlightenment (Skilton, 87). Thus if this component is kept in mind much of the stress would be comforted.
The Buddha elucidates immersion into Nirvana as achieving 'deathlessness' ( in Pali amata or amaravatai) or ' the unconditioned' and the highest spiritual attainment, which can be acquired through following a life of virtuous conduct in accordance with 'Dharma' (Bechert, 154). Buddhism approaches the concept of life through a sense of the higher and inner Soul or the "I" that describes the notion of void and selflessness. In Buddhism 'Moksha' or salvation happens when the soul or 'jivatman' recognizes its union with the source of all phenomenal existence - the Brahman. Advaita Vedanta says that the Self or Supreme Soul is formless, beyond being and non-being, beyond tangibility and comprehension (Bhaskarananda). An analogy is that the soul is like a drop of water, which upon salvation, merges with the ocean or the Supreme soul. The concept of non-duality through enlightment is best summed through the Sanskrit phrase - 'Tat Tvam Asi' or 'Thou Art That'. The quest of life is to break free of separation of the 'me' and 'you' and see everything as 'I AM' (Bhaskarananda, 177). ...
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