Political Thoughts of Marx and Rousseau

Masters
Book Report/Review
Philosophy
Pages 8 (2008 words)
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In The Communist Manifesto, Marx argues that the bourgeois reason requires steady and incomplete change in capital materials and, ultimately, society itself. Marx writes, "The bourgeoisie cannot live with no continually revolutionizing the instruments of manufacture, and thus the relations of manufacture, and with them the entire relations of society"…

Introduction

This is a great shame, for "conceptions of the nature and reason of art intimately similar man's conceptions of himself and of his fate, and they talk to us in ways far more forceful than abstract theory can do. Critics, when annoying to trace the reason of contemporary political evils, frequently say "It's Rousseau's fault." In a sense they are correct, but it is more generally right to say that the fault lies with an entire multifaceted of popular ideas that were already working influential changes on the public mind from side to side art, literature, and poetry. As it is true that the whole modern democracy group has been permanently shaped by the information of Rousseau that is partially since he so efficiently uttered assumptions that were rising in his time and gave them lasting political expression. They were facts concerning the nature of liberty and democracy that were distorted, and used by others, such as Robespierre, in ways that certainly would have surprised Rousseau. But it is for their vulnerability to use in such way that they must be studied. Rousseau's political facts were at once naive, "mystical," and socialist. (Orwin, 2003, pp 57-61)
Jean-Jacques Rousseau's extremely public defection from the position of France's eighteenth-century philosophes has enthused a huge deal of scholarly argument concerning his association to th ...
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