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Divine Bodies: Mystical Discourses in Philosophy - Essay Example

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Summary

Call for a divine is standard fare for all schools of philosophy of religion. However, when it comes to Irigaray's1 view of divinity, the issue can hardly be brought down to usual feministic struggle with metaphysical identities as imposed by patriarchal culture…

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Divine Bodies: Mystical Discourses in Philosophy

From time to time, she does offer interpretations of the issue, at least for the female population; however, not for interpretation itself, but rather as means to realize the depth of the concept in relation to feministic movement. Women have been multiply excluded for centuries in the normal life of society. Going even further then this, monotheistic religions outlawed the concept of female divinity, thus leading to alienation of women on a transcendental level and placing on female population the role of guardians of unethical societies. Luce Irigaray conceives of the divine as the ultimate beginning a society cannot exist without. Divine is not some kind of force, but rather a medium through which women can finally begin to communicate and relate to each other without their will being tied to the will of men. This concept rests on a presupposition, that men have defined own gender to be representative of the whole humanity, from now and on women are sentenced to embody the masculine view of the world. "By reducing matriarchal society to the kind of "Prehistory" that Luce Irigaray identifies as a partial, reductive, and fruitless conception of History. She gives credence to the idea that patriarchy is... the only History possible." (Murphy, P. ...
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