Plato In the Contemporary View

Book Report/Review
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It would be nearly impossible to read Plato and not be affected in one way or another. Republic has long been known to be a vision of Utopia, sought after by many leaders and systems, yet the very unpredictable character of humanity throws a wrench into the works every time.


In formulating his rhetorical arguments, Plato launches an invitation to delve deep into the matter at hand; his views on education are startling in their simplicity yet definitely do not fit in with the contemporary views held by our country's First Amendment; in Chapter 2 of Republic (trans. by Benjamin Jowett, 1901), Socrates indignantly states that fiction should be censored, separating the good from the bad. This is discussed as a necessity for good education of children. He further suggested that the children could only hear "authorized" tales of fiction and stated that most of the current fiction would have to be discarded due to its glorifying of (false) gods and heroes. Socrates despised lies and felt that children should not be exposed to them early in life and for no good reason. The ethos of Plato in Republic is made clear in his adherence to what is true and good and in proportion.
This was the foundation on which Plato's other offerings on education were built. If we look at this concept with any amount of depth, it is not difficult to understand that Plato's thoughts regarding outlandish stories about things that never (tangibly) existed were those of dismay. This is similar to the modern favor of special effects in a movie being more important than the quality of the story. ...
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