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Portrayal of guilt and retribution - Essay Example

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Author : meagan31

Summary

The use of improbable, high, and fanciful rather fantastic elements or dramatic scenes in the portrayal of retribution and sense of guilt heightens the sense of morality in realistic fiction. It was a typical 19th century fiction writer's ploy to add such sense of the division or battle between the good and the evil…

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Portrayal of guilt and retribution

Thus fantastic elements are added and metaphorically situated within the two stories to stray away from the sense of what is practical or what is practically considered to be "right" and the abundance of fantastic depictions therefore creating a conflict between the self and the society - thus drawing the connection with the Kantian philosophy of the State, justice and moral nature of man.
Kant introduced the idea of "Categorical Imperative"1 and that morality is fundamentally a priori in nature and therefore it claims that one's moral choices are always good as it is grounded in Reason and it is never a matter of choice or personal taste and it is universally seeks to be good and is a truth in itself. Thus the moral a priori truth that it holds all of us under the same universal law of good and bad becomes the apparatus of perception by which we define our acts and how we view guilt and retribution without regard to the relative context from which such immoral acts emerge. Thus, Michael Kohlhaans' guilt exists even when he knows that he acted against a wrongdoing committed against him, who is the actual criminal. This case of denial of justice does not necessarily redeem Kohlhaans from his acts of wrongdoing and even he knows it. ...
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