Philosophy of Locke

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Philosophy
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John Locke (1632-1704) was also called as "The Philosopher of Freedom" for his views and thoughts on Christianism. In Locke's view, unreal events (miracles), may be used only by Lord to get attention of people when his will is to show or to mark something very important…

Introduction

. . we will arrive at the conclusion that their testimony is reliable. In particular, Locke never doubted that the deeds of Jesus to which the gospel writers testify and which they interpreted as miracles, were in fact miracles; and further, that these miracles authenticated Jesus' prophetic status" (Chappell, 195-96).
Locke believes that morals could be a seriously affectionate science. He said that some day we might to reach moral and ethical conclusions as free from hesitation as the conclusions of mathematics. However, he fears that gaining this knowledge is rather complicated than gaining mathematical knowledge. Hi states, that the absence of a true moral science is replaced by moral teachings which are given toto us by Lord through his son - Jesus. God gave to his son a great power to make miracles exactly because He wished to notice these moral teachings.
AbstractLocke considers miracles to be critical in establishing the trust and reasonableness of Christian revelation and faith. He argues that the performance of miracles has a great significance in establishing the "credit of the proposer" who makes any assertion to giving a divine revelation. Locke links reason a main role in distinguishing false from sincere claims to divine revelation, including miracles. ...
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