Platonian Law

Book Report/Review
Pages 15 (3765 words)
Download 0
The Laws is the longest and final dialogue of Plato. It would be necessary to study the circumstances under which Plato is said to have written the dialogue. The motivation to establish the laws that the state should adopt to mete out justice, the authority of the state might have been expounded before in The Seventh Letter.


This particular dialogue, for greater part in history, had been neglected as opposed to Plato's monumental Republic. He uses the imaginary city of Magnesia to create an ideal city-state and establish an ideal political and judicial structure in the city. 1
This he establishes by a dialogue between an Athenian stranger, who acts as a representative for Plato, Megillos, a Spartan and a Cretan politician and lawgiver, Kleinias. The dialogue, since it takes place outside of Athens, does not figure Socrates. The book begins showing the Athenian stranger who is believed to be speaking for Plato himself; meet the other two characters in their journey to the cave of Zeus, a pilgrimage spot. During their journey to the cave of Zeus, Kleinias mentions that as a lawgiver and politician of Crete he has been entrusted with the job of establishing the judicial system in the city of Magnetes or Magnesia, in conjunction with nine other distinguished politicians from his city Knossos, and seeks the assistance of the stranger in the process of establishing the laws.2
The journey in itself is symbolic and resembles the journey of Minos to the cave, every nine years, to receive instructions from Zeus. ...
Download paper
Not exactly what you need?