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Hobbes (15 88-1679) on the right to all - Essay Example

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Author : larsongideon

Summary

Thomas Hobbes is an English philosopher, whose political thought rested on the philosophical tradition of sixteenth century and on orthodox theories, but he went beyond the limitations of these theories (skeptical relativism).
Hobbes supposes that what humans needed is order, and that to achieve it they must renounce the useless liberty of the state of nature…

Extract of sample
Hobbes (15 88-1679) on the right to all

And therefore, as long as this natural right of every man to everything endureth, there can be no security to any man (how strong or wise so ever he be) of living out the time which nature ordinarily allowith men to live." (Leviathan, Chapter XIV). Hobbes supposes that liberty is a matter of political self-government.
For Hobbes liberty and equality was connected with non-obstruction, and with some form of sell-mastery. Liberty and equality is described as that a personal reedom is a matter of the range of things a person may do without being stopped or punished by others. Hobbes supposes that "I find yet a greater equality amongst men than that of strength. For prudence is but experience, which equal time equally bestows on all men in those things they equally apply themselves unto (Leviathan, Chapter XIII). Someone who does not engage in elaborate calculations before acting may be said to be excessively irrational. Irrationality of value to the pursuit of self-interest is prudence, which is similarly a virtue that it is possible to have too much of.
Each has the right to all because, according to Hobbes, there was nothing natural about the state; in the 'state of nature' men lived without law, without authority, and without any means of curbing one another's aggression. Each man is a self-governed and can do anything. ...
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