Plato's Argument

Plato
Undergraduate
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Philosophy
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Name: University: Course: Tutor: Date: Much might have changed in this time and age when the Allegory of the Cave was penned by Plato, however, it lessons is still relevant to this generation just as it was then. This can be seen in the fact that just as Plato equated people untaught in the Theory of Forms to prisoners chained in caves in a way that obstruct them from reality, we are still confronted by such a picture…

Introduction

One notable thing about the Allegory of the Cave is that it presents, although in brief form, a number of Plato’s philosophical assumptions. In this regard, I am referring to his belief that the way the world is revealed in our senses is not a replica of the real world but a very poor copy as such. This belief which forms one of the most prominent philosophical assumption is best manifested in the Allegory of the Cave by Plato’s likening of this state of unrealistic world view with chained prisoner’s who think that the shadows that they see behind their chained position is what constitute reality, which unfortunately is fundamentally wrong. There are those who might voice several objections on Plato’s allegory. First, they might question the huge gap that he draws between the intelligible and the invisible realm. It appear like to him it is either you are chained or not, but nothing in-between. ...
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