Augustine, Aquinas and Locke: The Truth About Ownership - Essay Example

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Augustine, Aquinas and Locke: The Truth About Ownership

In Europe, however, the idea of ownership was much more developed, with various plots of land belonging to particular individuals who would then permit others to live on it and cultivate it for the benefit of the lord or state. There was a great deal of discussion and philosophy regarding what exactly comprised ownership and what ownership rights might be, particularly when disputes arose between the church and the people, particularly when the Catholic Church began breaking apart with the introduction of Protestantism. To understanding the basis of the concept of ownership, it is helpful to have an idea of what some of the philosophies are behind it. Several thinkers have given us well-considered treatises on the subject, including Augustine, Thomas Aquinas and John Locke, all of whom will be considered in attempting to determine the true nature of ownership. According to Augustine, ownership is a divine right given only by God or by the powers of the state. “No earthly thing is able to be possessed rightly by anyone except by divine right, by which all things belong to the just, or by human right, which is in the power of the kings of the earth” (Augustine 244). ...
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The truth about ownership is that it is a concept only brought about by human societies as a means of settling disputes or staking out private areas as was not always necessary. …
Author : alishaframi

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