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Nature of Justice in the Soul and State - Essay Example

College
Author : isobelherman
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Philosophy
Pages 3 (753 words)
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Name Professor Course Date Philosophy 1. Nature of Justice in the Soul and State Socrates view justice as ‘one of the cardinal human virtues’ or states of the soul. Based on the Plato’s Republic, three parts comprise the soul namely reason, spirit and appetite…

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Nature of Justice in the Soul and State

On a personal view, the definition of justice can be logical based on the fact that the three components of the soul can greatly affect the concept of justice. There is only one question in terms of the fact that reason, spirit and appetite can be considered as subjective or personal. This had been answered in the view that the soul is the microcosm of the state. Due to the fact that soul is hard to analyze, the corresponding events in the state can be studied to be able to understand the soul (Republic 436b8–9). With this analogy, it had been considered that by managing the state well, the soul can achieve happiness. For example, the part of the soul, reason is mainly interested in knowledge. In the state, reason corresponds to philosophers who have the virtue of wisdom. Honor is the main interest of the spirit and is possessed by the warriors who have the virtue of courage. Desire, which is the third component of the soul, can be equated to the commoners since the main interest is to achieve pleasures. They have the virtue of temperance (Republic 415a-433e). Looking through the different virtues, justice cannot be found. The main view of Plato is that justice can be found in all of the classes in the society, although each one may have different perception of the concept. In the dialogue, different individuals gave their opinions which all had logical points. ...
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